Womens Day Blog

Coronary Artery Disease (CHD)

Image default
Diseases

Coronary Artery Disease

Coronary Artery Disease 

In coronary artery disease (CAD), the large arteries that supply oxygen to the heart muscle (coronary arteries or coronary arteries) remain narrow. As a result, deposits produce it in the blood vessels that develop throughout life.

CHD can be acute or chronic. There is a heart attack in the acute form because a blood clot blocks one or more coronary veins. As necessary, part of the heart muscle does not receive oxygen. Since this part can die off, quick action is essential. Therefore, a heart attack is often treated with cardiac catheterization to reopen the vessel quickly.

A coronary artery is enduringly tapering in chronic (“stable”) CHD. As a consequence, less blood flows into the heart muscle than usual. As a result, the heart cannot beat more vigorously during physical exertion because it does not receive enough oxygen. It can cause complaints like shortness of breath and cause chest tightness. Symptoms subside within a few minutes with rest or medication.

After one Heart attack, but even with chronic CHD, it makes sense to take long-term medication that protects the vessels and prevents blood clots. This reduces the risk of secondary diseases.

Symptoms

Possible symptoms of CHD are a pain in the chest area. Some people describe them as rather dull, oppressive, constricting or burning. For others, it feels more like they have a large lump in their chest or throat—or like there’s a weighty heaviness on their chest. Such complaints willAngina pectoris (chest tightness) and can cause anxiety or fear.

The pain often radiates to the neck, back, upper abdomen, or jaw. You can suffer from shortness of breath, nausea, dizziness and general weakness; sweating or cold sweats may usher.

In females, the mature and people with diabetes or heart failure, CAD is less likely to cause the typical chest tightness. Then there are complaints like shortness of breath, upper abdominal pain or palpitations in the foreground. In the case of diabetes-related nerve damage, even one remainsHeart sometimes attacked unnoticed (silent infarction).

It is difficult for people who experience CAD symptoms for the first time to judge whether they are suffering from stress with stable CAD or from a Heart attack caused. That’s why it’s essential to identify possible signs of a diseased heart attack knowing and knowing what to do in an emergency.

Graphic: Typical pain areas in a heart attack or angina pectoris – as described in the text

Typical pain areas in a heart attack or angina pectoris

In coronary artery disease (CAD), the large arteries that supply oxygen to the heart muscle (coronary arteries or coronary arteries) are tapering. Deposits produce it in the blood vessels that develop throughout life.

CHD can be acute or chronic. There is a heart attack in the acute form because a blood clot blocks one or more coronary arteries. As a result, the share of the heart muscle does not receive oxygen. Since this part can die off, quick action is essential. Therefore, a heart attack is often treated with cardiac catheterization to reopen the vessel quickly.

A coronary artery is permanently narrowed in chronic (“stable”) CHD. As a result, less blood flows into the heart muscle than average. As a result, the heart cannot beat more vigorously during physical exertion because it does not receive enough oxygen. This can cause complaints like shortness of breath and cause chest tightness. Symptoms subside within a few minutes with rest or medication.

After one Heart attack, but even with chronic CHD, it makes sense to take long-term medication that protects the vessels and prevents blood clots. This reduces the risk of secondary diseases.

diagnosis

Chest pain can have many causes. Problems with the muscles or bones in the chest are often behind this. Diseases of the lungs, the oesophagus or the respiratory tract can also trigger chest pain – just like mental stress and diseases. In addition, other cardiovascular diseases such as myocarditis or cardiac arrhythmia can lead to similar symptoms.

To assess whether it is CHD, the doctor first asks about your age, other illnesses, how the symptoms feel, and when they occur. They also ask if there is a family history of cardiovascular disease and risk factors such as smoking. The chest is also palpated.

If there is a suspicion of CHD, the most critical examination is an Electrocardiogram (ECG). It can take place at rest or under stress. One is also possible ultrasound examination of the heart ( echocardiography ) or other imaging tests. Which additional studies are necessary in individual cases depends, for example, on age, previous illnesses and the type of symptoms.

To assess the risk of secondary diseases and plan CHD treatment, the doctor arranges for a series of further tests. Common diagnostics include:

Physical exams: Tests such as listening to the heart or palpation of the liver can provide clues about possible other conditions, such as heart failure or problems with the heart valves.

Type 2 diabetes can meaningfully increase the risk of complications.

In the long term, regular check-ups in the family doctor’s office are helpful in the case of CHD, for example, observing the course of the disease, adjusting the treatment, and talking about personal goals and possible problems. recommended check ups at intervals of 3 to 6 months

treatment

Among other things, on whether it is acute or chronic. Long-term treatment is essential to prevent secondary diseases and alleviate symptoms in both cases.

Heart attack treatment

At a Heart attack, are quickly given drugs that the blood clottinginhibit.

As a rule, the blocked artery is opened in the hospital with a heart catheter procedure (angioplasty) to restore blood flow as quickly as possible. A thin cardiac catheter is usually inserted into the affected vessel via an artery in the groin or, more rarely, in the wrist and advanced to the narrowed area.

long-term treatment

To avoid secondary diseases such as a (further) Heart attack or to prevent cardiac insufficiency, you can do something yourself: for example, ensure a healthy diet and sufficient exercise. Anyone who smokes can try to quit. Various drugs protect against secondary diseases and increase life expectancy. These include above all:

 

low dose acetylsalicylic acid (ACE) to prevent blood clots

statins to safeguard the vessels

Other medications may be an option depending on your situation and concurrent illnesses. Annual flu shots are recommended for people with CHD.  Studies show that a flu shot after a heart attack can prevent deaths.

 

Users also Read

Leave a Comment